Elizabeth Barnes: "Hermeneutical Injustice and Disability Pride"

March 3, 2015
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm
Room 1015 McPherson Lab, 140 W 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210
Photo of Elizabeth Barnes

Abstract:

This paper is an argument for the philosophical importance of Disability Pride. While the benefits of pride movements are generally seen as emotive - they help us feel a sense of solidarity, they help us overcome shame, etc - I argue that pride also plays a crucial epistemic role. The availability of Disability Pride doesn’t just affect how we feel about disability, it affects what we can know about disability.

Elizabeth Barnes, University of Virginia, works on metaphysics, social philosophy, and feminist philosophy - and is particularly interested in the areas where these subjects interact. She's currently writing a book on disability and thinking a lot about the metaphysics of social structures. She's also the editor of Philosophy Compass. Among her many writings on a variety of ethical and metaphysical issues are the following articles focusing on the concept and evaluation of disabilities: "Valuing Disability, Causing Disability," Ethics (2014), "Disability and Adaptive Preference," Philosophical Perspectives (2009), and "Disability, Minority, and Difference,Journal of Applied Philosophy (2009). Professor Barnes' talk for the Center for Ethics and Human Values will present an argument drawn from her forthcoming book, The Minority Body (Oxford University Press).

CART (Computer Assisted Real-time Transcription) will be provided at this event by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

To ask questions about accessibility or request accommodations, please contact Michelle Brown at 614-292-7914 or brown.930@osu.edu. Two weeks' advance notice will allow us to provide seamless access.

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