CARE Events

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CARE Events

April 21, 2020 - Ethics of AI in Research

Panelists include: 

  • Alex John London (Clara L. West Professor of ethics and Philosophy, Director fo the Center for Ethics and Policy, and Director of the Ethics History and Public Policy Program, Carnegie Mellon University)

 

March 17, 2020 - Ethics of Data Sharing in Research

Panelists include: 

  • Kayte Spector-Bagdady (Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Chief of Research Ethics Service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School)

 

February 18, 2020 - Genomics Research with Indigenous Communities

Panelists include:

  • Katrina Claw (Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus)

 

January 28, 2020 - The Ethics of Community Engaged Research

There has been a recent push for community engaged research, particularly when the research is conducted across cultural, structural and economic differences. In this panel we will examine what exactly ought to count as engaging a community as a research partner. What constitutes a community in the first place? Can individual representatives be recruited to speak for the community? If so, who? How do our common research practices and norms – such as informed consent and authorship - change when we engage the community? How do we measure the success of a projects’  community engagement?

This panel will feature Charles Weijer (Professor; Canada Research Chair in Bioethics, Western University), a leading expert on the ethics of randomized controlled trials.

 

December 3, 2019 - International Research Local Practices

When it comes to conducting international research, there are distinctive ethical challenges that researchers must confront given the global reach of their work. Securing host country approval and adhering to regulatory oversight are important, but they do not ensure community buy-in on the ground or that researchers are designing their studies in a manner that is sensitive to and respectful of local practices. In this CARE panel, we will explore some recent cases where researchers had to navigate complex ethical terrain in the course of their field work.

Panelists include: 

 

October 22, 2019 - The Ethics of Paying Research Subjects

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It is common practice to offer payment to research subjects, either to enhance recruitment or to enable people to participate without financial sacrifice. While common, the practice is highly contentious. Some worry that paying subjects unduly influences their choice to participate, by impairing their judgment or by giving them an offer they cannot refuse. Others argue that we do not pay research participants enough, making participation for research overly burdensome for some already marginalized populations. This panel will debate these concerns. Questions that will be discussed include the following: Is it ever wrong to offer money for research participation? Is some payment too much or too little? What alternatives to monetary compensation are appropriate? Who should decide how much research subjects get paid?

Panelists include:

 

September 17, 2019 ​​​​​​- The Ethics of Co-Authorship in Research

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Scholarship is rarely, if ever, a one-person job anymore. Co-authored papers are common in the sciences and are becoming more prominent in the humanities due to greater specialization, technological assistance in communication and data sharing, the emergence of funding for big collaborative projects, and increased institutional openness to interdisciplinary work. With increased opportunities and expectations for collaboration, researchers face many ethical conundrums in thinking about how to give everyone due credit for the work that they put in. This panel will address some of the most pressing issues in the ethics of joint authorship and collaboration. Topics will include how to navigate power imbalances in the authorship relationship, how to hold each other accountable, when one should refuse to co-author, and the differences between authorship, contribution, and mentorship.

Panelists include:

 

April 23, 2019 - The Researcher as Advocate?

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Many people go into research because of their deep moral commitment to some cause. Many researchers become deeply committed to some social causes as a result of their research. How does one balance their role as researcher and their role as advocate? This panel invited researchers who have engaged in advocacy related to racial justice, climate change, and HIV research. In this panel, we discussed how their research has informed and been informed by their work in advocacy and whether they have encountered tensions between these two roles. 

Panelists include: 

 

March 26, 2019 - Research in Humanitarian Crises

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Disasters and conflicts lead to crises that call for humanitarian responses. How can we know that the type of response being provided is actually effective, timely, and the best use of the available resources? To answer these questions, there has been a recent drive for more research and other evidence-generating activities related to humanitarian aid. But research related to humanitarian aid often involve human participants and thus raise ethical issues of their own. This CARE panel discussed the distinctive challenges of conducting research during and after humanitarian crises. Among the questions discussed: How can such research avoid exploitation? What counts as good evidence of efficacy? What sort of risks can we expect research participants to sign up for? Is informed consent possible? Are there conditions under which research is not appropriate and the sole priority should be providing aid? 

This panel was a session in the PREA International Conference on Ethics and Humanitarian Research.

Panelists include: 

  • Veena Pillai (Dhi Consulting and Training, Malaysia)
  • Erin Lin (Political Science, OSU)
  • Marcel Yotebieng (Public Health, OSU)

 

February 19, 2019 - Reproducibility in Research

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According to one recent Nature survey, more than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist’s experiments, and more than half have failed to reproduce their own experiments. Some claim that these findings point to a “Crisis of Reproducibility” and it has caused alarm in a far ranging number of disciplines. But is there really any crisis at play and if so what are the ethical responsibilities of researchers and institutions in addressing this trend? This panel discussed the potential ethical implications for the lack of reproducibility in research results not only for the reliability of science but also for the safety of research subjects.

Panelists include: 

 

January 22, 2019 - Conflicts of Interest and Research: Is Disclosure Enough?

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A New York Times/Pro Publica investigation recently exposed dozens of leading medical figures who have failed to report their financial relationships with pharmaceutical and health care companies when their studies are published in medical journals. This has resulted in high profile resignations from leading medical research centers and investigations into the policies of leading journals. In this inaugural panel we will discuss the nature of this pressing problem and how it can best be addressed. Some questions that we will discuss: How should we address the danger of conflicts of interest? Is disclosure enough? Given the nature of these ethical abuses, is the term 'conflict-of-interest' the appropriate term? Is it too bland? Failure to disclose conflicts of interest is a breach of public trust, but is there any evidence that COIs actually have any effect on research outcomes? Do professional and institutional bodies overemphasize the dangers of financial COIs without attending to the prevalence of non-financial conflicts of interest?

Panelists include: 

 

If you would like to recommend a panel topic and/or panel participants, please email us at cehv@osu.edu.